Traumatology & orthopedics

Knee replacement

Knee replacement is a surgical option to deal with the pain of arthritis or damage from a traumatic or degenerative injury that does not respond to other treatment options. In knee replacement surgery, your doctor replaces the weight-bearing surfaces of bone and cartilage with artificial parts made of metal and plastic.

A round-ended implant is used for the femur, mimicking the natural shape of the joint. On the tibia the component is flat, although it sometimes has a stem that goes down inside the bone for further stability. The parts of the artificial joint are designed to fit together and rub smoothly against each other, taking away the pain of bone rubbing against bone. Knee replacement surgery can be performed as a partial or total knee replacement.

Hip replacement

Hip replacement is a surgical option to deal with the pain of arthritis or the damage from a traumatic or degenerative injury that does not respond to other treatment options. In hip replacement surgery, your doctor replaces the weight-bearing surfaces of bone and cartilage with artificial parts made of metal and plastic. The damaged femoral head is removed and replaced with a metal stem that is placed into the hollow center of the femur. A metal or ceramic ball is placed on the upper part of the stem, replacing the damaged femoral head.

The damaged cartilage surface of the socket (acetabulum) is removed and replaced with a metal socket. A plastic, ceramic or metal spacer is inserted between the new ball and the socket to allow for a gliding surface. The parts of the artificial joint are designed to fit together and move smoothly against each other, taking away the pain of bone rubbing against bone. Hip replacement surgery aims to relieve pain, increase motion and help you get back to enjoying normal, everyday activities.

Knee Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy allows your doctor to look within your knee joint and make certain repairs without the larger incision needed for traditional surgery. In an arthroscopic procedure, your doctor makes a small incision and then inserts instruments that contain a miniature fiberoptic television camera and lighting system to magnify and illuminate the structures inside the joint.

Surgical instruments can be inserted through small, nearby incisions, allowing the surgeon to make repairs. Arthroscopic surgery is an extremely valuable tool because it is generally easier on the patient than “open” surgery. Procedures possible using this technique include removing any loose bodies or inflammatory/degenerative tissue in the joint, smoothing out irregular surfaces, and repairing cartilage, ligaments, muscles and tendons. In the knee, it is often used for meniscal (cartilage) tears, chondromalacia (wearing or injury of cartilage cushion), anterior cruciate ligament tears with instability, and synovitis (inflammation of the lining in the knee).